International Regeneration Studio Reconstructing Chamanga 2018

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MoDDD and UIC Barcelona students

From February 4-13 MoDDD Program Manager Judy Rogers and students Zoe d’Arcy and Nikhila Madabhushi travelled to Ecuador to join a team of staff and students from UIC Barcelona for the international regeneration workshop “Reconstructing Chamanga”.

The group was joined by Professor Sergio Palleroni from Portland State University and local practitioners Monica Salazar, Sebastian Oveido and Lorena Burbano.

The Workshop was organized and led by Carmen Mendoza Arroyo and Allison Koornneef from the School of Architecture, UIC, Barcelona and was aimed at contributing to the rebuilding efforts in the town in the aftermath of the earthquake measuring 7.8 on the Richter scale that struck on April 16th, 2016, affecting populations along the coast, including Chamanga.

As this was our second year coming to Chamanga, our intent was to assess the five sites worked on during the 2017 workshop. Through an analysis of the physical transformation and a qualitative assessment of how the changes were modifying the urban function of the city and the way of life in the Chamanga community, students developed proposals to contribute to reconstruction efforts.

Since 2017 many residents have been resettled, but still lack access to water.

Below are some of the images collected by Zoe and Nikhila during the trip.

Image 2: Original fisherman houses along the waterfront in Chamanga.
Original fisherfolk houses along the waterfront in Chamanga. After the 2016 earthquake it was determined that this area was too dangerous to rebuild in. Despite this, some families are still living here. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 1: A bamboo structure built one year ago for Chamanga residents
A bamboo structure built one year ago for Chamanga residents living in tents is abandoned now that people have moved into replacement housing. Workshop students were interested in ways that the structure could be reintegrated into social life. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy).
Image 3: Students last year started decorating these stairs with shells.
Students last year started decorating these stairs with shells. We were delighted to find that the job had been finished by the residents of Chamanaga! (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 4: Earthquake damage is still evident in some parts of Chamanga, nearly 2 years after the event.
Earthquake damage is still evident in some parts of Chamanga, nearly two years after the event. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 5: We were suprised by the style of the new houses built for Chamanga residents - it was vastly different to the rest of the fishing village.
We were suprised by the style of the new houses built for Chamanga residents – it was vastly different to the rest of the fishing village. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 6: Despite its modern look - the new settlement lacked basic services. Here is water being delivered.
Despite its modern look the new settlement lacked basic services. Here is water being delivered. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 1: We visited the nearby abandoned village on Playa de Portete.
We visited the nearby abandoned village on Playa de Portete. Residents decided to move after the earthquake – largely because their island is disappearing due to rapid land erosion. There were hints as to were houses had been located. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
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The island was still a popular destination for tourists – we found that the beach restaurant had created canopies with UNHCR tarps. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 2: Catching a ride over to Playa de Portete
Catching a ride over to Playa de Partite. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
Image 4: The Playa de Portete residents had been relocated into identical houses to those used in Chamanga.
The Playa de Portete residents had been relocated into identical houses to those used in Chamanga. The layout was quite different, and looked friendlier. During our stay, though, this village suffered a landslide during heaving rain, and some of these houses had to be evacuated. (Image and caption courtesy of Zoe D’arcy)
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This is Baltin, a local leader in Chamanga who is also a musician / performer. He has been one of the most central figures in recovery and reconstruction in Chamanga at a community level. (Image and caption courtesy of Nikhila Madabhushi)
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Tide surge is also affecting Mompiche the town we based ourselves during the field trip. Here we are observing locals trying to fortify existing barricades that have deteriorated along the coast line. (Image and caption courtesy of Nikhila Madabhushi)
Here we were meant to present draft concepts for reconstruction to local stakeholders.
Here we were meant to present draft concepts for reconstruction to local stakeholders. Unfortunately only the President and School Director turned up along with a couple of local Ecuadorian architects who have been “on the ground” in Chamanga since the earthquake. We did this at the local school in Chamanga. (Image and caption courtesy of Nikhila Madabhushi)
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Judy doing a presentation on Marysville for the UIC students and staff. (Image and caption courtesy of Nikhila Madabhushi)
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A picture taken during a meeting with the President of Chamanga Gabriel and Director of the local school Pedro. Here it became evident that the vision of locals is likely to be vastly different (or contradictory) to that of local governance. (Image and caption courtesy of Nikhila Madabhushi)

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